Chronic fatigue syndrome is associated with diminished intracellular perforin

Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is an illness characterized by unexplained and prolonged fatigue that is often accompanied by abnormalities of immune, endocrine and cognitive functions. Diminished natural killer cell cytotoxicity (NKCC) is a frequently reported finding. However, the molecular basis of this defect of in vitro cytotoxicy has not been described. Perforin is a protein found within intracellular granules of NK and cytotoxic T cells and is a key factor in the lytic processes mediated by these cells. Quantitative fluorescence flow cytometry was used to the intracellular perforin content in CFS subjects and healthy controls. A significant reduction in the NK cell associated perforin levels in samples from CFS patients, compared to healthy controls, was observed. There was also an indication of a reduced perforin level within the cytotoxic T cells of CFS subjects, providing the first evidence, to our knowledge, to suggest a T cell associated cytotoxic deficit in CFS. Because perforin is important in immune surveillance and homeostasis of the immune system, its deficiency may prove to be an important factor in the pathogenesis of CFS and its analysis may prove useful as a biomarker in the study of CFS.

Screening NK-, B- and T-cell phenotype and function in patients suffering from Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

CFS individuals analyzed in this study show no differences in B-cell compartment, skewed NK cells and poorly responsive T cells.
The observed immunological defaults do not provide any causative link to the illness, but could explain some of the symptoms and in particular the poor control of viral infections reported in these individuals. Some of these biomarkers may be useful for the characterization of CFS. (But you have to distinguiesh between ME, CFS ,or both).

Role of adaptive and innate immune cells in chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis.

Significant changes were observed in B-cell subsets, Tregs, CD4+CD73+CD39+ T cells, cytotoxic activity, granzyme B, neutrophil antigens, TNF-α and IFN-γ in the CFS/ME patients in comparison with the non-fatigued controls. Alterations in B cells, Tregs, NK cells and neutrophils suggest significant impairments in immune regulation in CFS/ME and these may have similarities to a number of autoimmune disorders.

Epitopes of Microbial and Human Heat Shock Protein 60 and Their Recognition in Myalgic Encephalomyelitis.

Abstract Myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME, also called Chronic Fatigue Syndrome), a common disease with chronic fatigability, cognitive dysfunction and myalgia of unknown etiology, often starts with an infection. The chaperonin human heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) occurs in mitochondria and in bacteria, is highly conserved, antigenic and a major autoantigen. The anti-HSP60 humoral (IgG and IgM)…

Screening NK-, B- and T-cell phenotype and function in patients suffering from Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Very long and technical article. 22 patients and 30 healthy controls were tested for certain cells that are part of the immune system. They found an unaffected B-cell compartment, a biased NK-cell phenotype and a poorly responsive T-cell compartment as the main immune features of ME/CFS affected individuals. The striking down modulation of T cell mediated immunity may help to understand intercurrent viral infections in CFS.