Self-Regulatory Fatigue: A Missing Link in Understanding Fibromyalgia and Other Chronic MultiSymptom Illnesses.

This is the first study to show higher SRF relating to lower QoL for patients with FMS. Results suggest that SRF is distinct from anxiety, depression, and fatigue, and predicts QoL above and beyond these traditional factors in the area of chronic multisymptom illnesses such as FMS. SRF may be a “missing link” in understanding the complex nature of chronic multisymptom illnesses.

Could Mitochondrial Dysfunction Be a Differentiating Marker Between Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Fibromyalgia?

Researchers found that both CFS/fibromyalgia patients have low Coenzyme Q10 levels and low ATP levels, and increased levels of lipid peroxidation (which is an indicator for damage caused by oxidative stress).

In addition fibromyalgia patients had low levels of two mitochondrial enzymes and a mitochondrial protein, and reduced levels of mitochondrial DNA content, while all of those were normal in CFS patients. Therefor mitochondrial dysfunction-dependent events could be a biomarker to distinguish between FM and CFS.

A bloodspot-based diagnostic test for fibromyalgia syndrome and related disorders

Researchers were able to differentiate patients with FM from those with osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and to identify molecular species associated with the spectral patterns.

They demonstrated the ability of IRMS to achieve reliable resolution of unique spectral patterns specific to FM.
Metabolomic analysis revealed that RA and OA groups were metabolically similar, whereas biochemical differences were identified in the FM that were quite distinctive from those found in the other two groups.

Neuromuscular strain as a contributor to cognitive and other symptoms in chronic fatigue syndrome: hypothesis and conceptual model

Because it is not possible to differentiate completely between adverse neural tension and strain in muscles, fascia, and other soft tissues, we use the more general term “neuromuscular strain.”
Neuromuscular restrictions are common in CFS, and many symptoms of CFS can be reproduced by selectively adding neuromuscular strain during the examination.
In this paper we submit that neuromuscular strain is a previously unappreciated peripheral source of sensitizing input to the nervous system, and that it contributes to the pathogenesis of CFS symptoms, including cognitive dysfunction.